GFM Network News


“Silo” is a 2019 movie depicting a grain entrapment accident in a small, American farming community.

Silver screen grain entrapment mirrors real-life peril for Winkler farmer

Canola growers’ associations used virtual screenings of movie ‘Silo’ to discuss dangers of work inside grain bins

As Randy Froese sat buried beneath two or three feet of mouldy pinto beans at the bottom of a hopper bin, his phone began to ring. It was probably his wife, he thought, calling to ask when he’d be home for supper. “As I sat there, I couldn’t move,” he said. “I thought, I am

STAR-7 lifts-off during a mock accident exercise in the RM of Rosser in 2018.

STARS sees summer spike in calls

The Manitoba base saw a near-record 81 calls in August

STARS air ambulance saw its second-highest number of monthly calls to date last month, with 81 calls during August this year. Of those, 45 were on-scene emergencies, while the remaining 36 were inter-facility transfers. Why it matters: With so many farms being remotely located, STARS unfortunately responds to a number of agricultural accidents each year, with call


Keeping kids safe on the farm is a dilemma the farming community needs to address.

Editorial: Too many kids still dying on farms

Over the last two decades there has been a noticeable increase in education and training designed to make farms safer places for children to grow up. Kids, even toddlers, often like to tag along with their farming parent. As they grow older and more capable they have traditionally been an important source of labour on

A new study reveals 
how farmers balance the
 risk of children’s injuries 
with the benefits of giving 
them experience in the 
farm workplace.

High rates of child death and injury persist: Why farm children are put at risk

Parents interviewed say there’s benefits 
to including children in tasks on the farm

Much work has been done around child safety on the farm, and the high incidence of injuries and deaths among Canadian farm children is well documented. But there hasn’t been much effort put into understanding why parents allow children into dangerous situations. A new study sheds some light on the reasons, and may help prevent

Comment: Agriculture’s greatest innovation

Farms are still dangerous, but they’ve got a lot better over the years

In my youth, May brought two noticeable changes to the big Lutheran Church my family faithfully attended. The first was heat. No building on earth better held daytime heat from Mother’s Day through Reformation Day than that century-old house of worship. The second was the season’s short-sleeved parade of lost limbs, a brutal testament to


Editorial: Safety first

A few years ago I had what I now ruefully refer to as a series of unfortunate events. It began innocently enough with a phone call one Saturday morning from a friend, wondering if I could help him move a couch. An hour or so later, on a frosty March morning, we were wrestling it

The Van Camp family (l) and the Fox family.

Because I love you

Two widows discuss how forward planning helped their families carry on 
following the farm accidents that claimed their husbands

Jay Fox and Brian Van Camp both died in farm accidents involving loaders right before Christmas, leaving their families in shock and still trying to run their farms. Jay and Angie were Outstanding Young farmers in Manitoba and leaders in the cattle industry. Brian and Maggie were also leaders in their community and agriculture. Here’s