GFM Network News


Canola council: Widen the scope on clubroot management

The Canola Council of Canada wants producers to layer their clubroot management strategies

The Canola Council of Canada wants you to take a shotgun to your field — at least when it comes to clubroot. [AUDIO: ‘Are we taking clubroot seriously enough?’ – Justine Cornelsen and Dan Orchard] Council agronomists are urging farmers to avoid building a clubroot plan around a single silver bullet. Instead, agronomists Justine Cornelsen

The learning curve of cover crops

Cover crops may have an almost endless number of combinations, but end goals, planting windows and seed costs may help narrow down species selection

It’s not enough to convince producers to give cover crops a shot — there needs to be a game plan. There are plenty of reasons why. Seed can be expensive, especially if there’s no livestock to help recoup that cost through their digestive systems. Many worry the fall seeding window is too narrow to give


How a radish cover crop interseeded into soybeans planted in August looked on Sept. 27, 2019.

Calling all cover croppers!

A survey is looking for hard numbers on the practice and what it looks like on Prairie farms

The University of Manitoba is looking for numbers on local cover crop use, and it’s turning to producers to get them. Yvonne Lawley of the University of Manitoba is spearheading the Prairie Cover Crop Survey, which hopes to gauge how widely and in what form cover crops are taking root across the Prairies. The survey

Fall is the time when you can see what’s survived your crop season’s control efforts.

Fall management key to weed resistance

It’s in the fall you see what worked and what you can change up for next year

When it comes to weed control, fall is often one of your best windows to find out how it’s going and what issues are on the horizon. Tammy Jones, Manitoba Agriculture weed specialist, says the fall season offers a planning window for next year and lets farmers evaluate what went right or wrong this season.

Yvonne Lawley talks cover crops during Crops-A-Palooza in Carberry in July.  
photos: Alexis Stockford

Calculating a good cover crop plan

Set yourself up for success when it comes to cover crops

Farmers will need more than a cursory plan to reap the benefit of cover crops in the Keystone province. Cover crops have gained their champions in Manitoba. The practice is cited among other alternative grazing strategies like bale or swath grazing to extend the grazing season and, arguably, improve soil, according to livestock and forage


A blend of cover crop species is a tasty blend for cattle, but make sure they aren’t yours.

Mixed farmers need not apply for cover crop funding

The province says cover crop funding under Ag Action Manitoba only allows grazing on ‘stockless farms’

You can graze cattle on cover crops planted with help from Ag Action Manitoba — as long as they’re not your cattle, that is. Ag Action Manitoba is the province’s vehicle for funding under the Canadian Agricultural Partnership (CAP) program. Cover crops are among the beneficial management practices (BMPs) it promotes to improve the environment.

Farmers, agronomists, and people with an interest in global soil health met in Carman July 25 and 26 to discuss the challenges of protecting soil.

Carman event serves up common ground on soil health practices

Canadian and African agronomists shared perspectives on conservation agriculture at a recent Canadian Foodgrains Bank forum

Jocelyn Velestuk stood in front of the research station classroom filled with people and confessed to an addiction of sorts. “I am obsessed with soil,” the Saskatchewan farmer and agronomist told her audience. “I even had a mud-themed birthday party when I was young,” she said in a later interview. “The first soil science class

Manitoba growers haven’t yet voted with their acres when it comes to accepting corn as a major crop in the province, 
despite some modest growth.

Corn’s future should be bright in Manitoba

The results of five years of corn agronomy research show it to be among the most profitable crops but farmers aren’t yet adopting it widely

Corn has seen some moderate acreage gains recently as a crop for farmers in Manitoba, and for good reason. The yield per acre seeded has grown exponentially over the past 20 years. But that growth in acres hasn’t been exponential as well. It’s been more in the realm of the slow and steady. For example,


Clubroot galls are the sure sign the disease is present, but dead patches in the field should also be easy to spot at swathing time.

The Manitoba clubroot advantage

So far the transmission pattern for the disease suggests farmers in this province still have time to act

It looks like clubroot is moving just a bit differently in Manitoba and that could be good news for producers trying to slow or stop its spread. Bruce Gossen, a research scientist with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), told the Manitoba agronomist conference earlier this winter there’s a clear pattern in the other Prairie provinces

There’s no shortage of problems to solve on the average farm.

Overcoming ongoing challenges key to success

Farmer panel says finding solutions through trial and error moves operations forward

Farming is problem solving in action. There’s always a new challenge and there isn’t always a ready solution. Why it matters: Farms always have challenges to face. These farmers say they looked for permanent solutions, some of which evolved over time. What’s interesting is how every farmer chooses to deal with those challenges. At the