GFM Network News


Study shows how U.S. farm landscapes could be reshaped by climate

Plains' wheat belt would see 'hollowing-out'

London | Thomson Reuters Foundation — Climate change could render swaths of agricultural land largely useless for farming in the U.S. South, and force Midwestern farmers to move corn and soybeans elsewhere as crop yields decline, researchers said on Monday. The profits of growing six key crops are set to fall by almost a third



U.S. regulators allow GM cotton as human food source

Washington | Reuters — U.S. regulators on Friday gave the green light for genetically modified cotton to be used for human consumption, paving the way for a protein-packed new food source — edible cottonseed that tastes a bit like chickpeas — that its developers said could help tackle global malnutrition. The Food and Drug Administration’s

Crown pension fund bids for Australian ag firm Webster

Reuters — Australian agribusiness company Webster Ltd. said on Thursday it has signed a deal for a A$854 million (C$763.65 million) takeover by shareholder PSP Investments, one of Canada’s biggest pension funds. The walnut, cotton and livestock producer said the A$2 per share offer — a 57.5 per cent premium to Wednesday’s ordinary shares closing

Trump trade-war aid sows frustration in farm country

Rochester, Minnesota | Reuters — The U.S. government is paying Texas cotton farmer J. Walt Hagood US$145 an acre for losses related to U.S. President Donald Trump’s trade policies. But Minnesota soybean farmer Betsy Jensen will get just US$35 an acre. Both farmers’ sales have taken heavy blows in Trump’s trade war with China. Neither


Farmer Darrin Eck with his tractor and cotton planter near Harper, Kansas, May 11, 2018.

King Cotton makes a comeback

U.S. farmers in the southern plains are piling into the textile crop after souring on wheat

Farmers in Kansas and Oklahoma are planting more land with cotton than they have for decades as they ditch wheat, attracted by relatively high cotton prices and the crop’s ability to withstand drought. A 20 per cent increase from last year marks a sharp turnaround for the crop that once dominated the Mississippi Delta into

U.S. corn, soy acreage to expand in 2018-19, USDA says

Chicago | Reuters — U.S. farmers are likely to expand plantings of both corn and soybeans while reducing wheat seedings for the upcoming marketing year, the U.S. Agriculture Department said on Tuesday. The USDA’s Office of the Chief Economist forecast that farmers will seed 91 million acres of corn in the 2018-19 crop year, up

Monsanto presses against Arkansas’ dicamba limits

Chicago | Reuters — Monsanto Co. pushed Arkansas authorities on Thursday to reject a proposed April 15 cutoff date next year for sprayings of the agricultural herbicide dicamba, which has been linked to crop damage across the U.S. farm belt. The company further said that Arkansas’ plant board should allow farmers in the state to


From sugar mills to hog farms, U.S. agriculture braces for Irma

Chicago/New York | Reuters — Hurricane Irma sent farmers and food companies scrambling to protect processing facilities, farm fields and animal herds in the south and southeastern parts of the U.S. on Wednesday. Florida sugar and citrus processors rushed to secure rail cars and equipment that could be crushed, blocked or turned into flying projectiles.