GFM Network News


Over 1,000 species, including mammals, birds, amphibians and plant species, many of which can’t exist in any other type of habitat, make their homes on Canadian rangelands particularly livestock grazing operations.

Conservationists should support beef sector

Land use and habitat index values 
for beef cattle production and 
other agricultural areas in Canada

Cattle producers and conservationists need to team up to defeat the perception beef is bad for the environment. Unless they do so, both sides risk losing ground. Why it matters: The conservation community and the cattle sector in Canada must put their differences aside and start telling consumers about the environmental benefits of eating beef.

Opinion: Celebrate World Wetlands Day

February 2 is a day to remember the vital ecological importance of these distinct ecosystems

February 2, 2019, is World Wetlands Day celebrating the signing of the Ramsar Convention in Iran in 1971 where the purpose was to recognize the importance of wetlands to society. So what’s the big deal about wetlands? To start, we know that wetlands are considered to be a vital part of the Manitoba prairie landscape.


Geospatial analyst Chigo Ibeh reviews a land-cover map of Baltimore at the office of the Chesapeake Conservancy in Annapolis, Maryland.


Can artificial intelligence aid conservation mapping?

Microsoft is betting it can speed up this labour-intensive process with modern tools

Thomson Reuters Foundation – In December 2016, environmental group Chesapeake Conservancy unveiled one of the largest, high-resolution land-cover maps made in the United States. It analyzed every square metre of satellite data in the 207 cities and counties that touch the watershed of the Chesapeake Bay on the U.S. eastern seaboard. The bay, North America’s

The proposed watershed districts.

New era begins for conservation districts in 2019

Amalgamations will reduce the number of conservation districts from 18 to 14, hereafter to be called watershed districts

Big changes are ahead in 2019 for Manitoba’s conservation districts. The current 18 existing entities are merging into 14, afterward to be called watershed districts, and given expanded mandates for water management. New boundaries and name changes will be just part of a broad array of changes made to the program, as the provincial government

Part of Manitoba’s Climate and Green Plan, the $102-million Conservation Trust will fund activities that create, conserve, or enhance natural infrastructure in Manitoba.

A watershed moment — province funds Conservation Trust

When fully capitalized, the fund is expected to generate about $5 million a year for projects and environmental goods and services

The ink is now dry on Manitoba’s new Conservation Trust agreement, and groups looking to it to support new programs with it should submit letters of intent by January 15. The province signed its agreement December 11, putting in an initial $28-million contribution this month, towards making the $102-million trust it announced in last spring’s


Local ALUS co-ordinator and conservation district manager, Colleen Cuvelier, explains one of several perennial forage projects ALUS is funding in the Little Saskatchewan River Conservation District during a July 2018 field tour.

ALUS gains steam in western Manitoba

ALUS returned to its roots in the Little Saskatchewan River Conservation District in 2014, and producers are buying in

A multi-province program that promises to pay landowners for conservation practices is attracting so much interest in the Little Saskatchewan River Conservation District that providers say they can’t meet the demand. District manager and local ALUS co-ordinator, Colleen Cuvelier said program co-ordinators couldn’t accommodate all the proposals this year, estimating another 100-200 acres could have

Weighing in on Manitoba's new Sustainable Watersheds Act.

New law aims to protect wetlands, lakes, rivers

The Manitoba government passes its Sustainable Watersheds Act to co-ordinate programs and policy in water management

The Manitoba government has adopted a carrot-and-stick approach to addressing an issue that has divided neighbours and cost the provincial economy billions due to flooding and reduced water quality. Fines for breaking the rules will rise sharply, but incentives for protecting key wetlands are being developed, and the approval process for low-impact drainage projects will be streamlined.

2,000 Hectares That’s how much wetland Manitoba loses every year to drainage. The new law specifies no net loss of “wetland benefits.” Source: Manitoba government $748 Million Protecting key wetlands would prevent 1,000 tonnes of P and 55,000 tonnes of N from entering lakes and waterways annually. The estimated saving on removal using existing technology:

Some new proposed initiatives will create a new model for the province.

New era beginning for conservation work, says MCDA chairman

Meetings held to talk over future boundary changes, new programming

It’s a new day for conservation efforts in Manitoba, according to the chair of the Manitoba Conservation Districts Association. Ray Frey, who’s also an executive member of the Little Saskatchewan Conservation District, says there are a number of new and proposed initiatives that are going to create a new paradigm in the province. There’s the


Editorial: Go ask ALUS

It’s long been a dream of Manitoba farmers for an ecological goods and services program that would pay them for providing environmental benefits for the good of society at large. The concept was first proposed by former KAP president Ian Wishart, now provincial minister of education and training, under the moniker ALUS or Alternative Land

A new government program could help compensate farmers for their work protecting 
environmental features like wetlands and riparian areas.

Manitoba budget contains multimillion-dollar conservation trust

There’s great potential for the trust to help farmers help the environment, says KAP

A $102-million conservation trust fund announced in the Manitoba government’s March 12 budget could help compensate farmers for protecting the environment, says Keystone Agricultural Producers president Dan Mazier. “That’s how I see the fund being used, but I’m not certain if all of it will be,” Mazier said from his farm near Justice, Man., in