GFM Network News


Cattle values steady despite futures’ drop

Cattle values steady despite futures’ drop

Despite falling prices on U.S. cattle futures markets, bids remained steady at auction sites in Manitoba during the week ending April 29. More than 7,200 cattle went through the rings during the week, down from 8,600 the week earlier, as feeder numbers start to settle down before the summer. While prices have remained steady for

(Photo courtesy Canada Beef Inc.)

Klassen: Feeder cattle markets experience volatility

Beef prices encourage slaughter pace

Compared to the previous week, western Canadian feeder cattle markets traded $3-$4 on either side of week-ago levels. Prices were quite variable across the Prairies with four main factors influencing buyer sentiment. First, the eastern Prairie regions experienced adverse winter weather. Auction barns in Manitoba and eastern Saskatchewan had smaller volumes on offer. Buyers shied


Pipestone fire a loss for Manitoba markets

Pipestone fire a loss for Manitoba markets

Top-end bids for feeder cattle show signs of coming off

Manitoba’s cattle sector took a hit during the week as a fire destroyed the historic Pipestone Livestock Sales yard in the southwestern corner of the province. The blaze started at around 6:30 p.m. on March 1, with over 80 per cent of the structures and equipment engulfed in flames and destroyed, according to owner Gene

(Photo courtesy Canada Beef Inc.)

Klassen: Feeder market bounces on optimistic outlook

Feed barley remains near historical highs

Compared to last week, western Canadian yearling prices traded $2-$4 higher; prices for mid-weight calves were quoted $4-$8 above week-ago levels. Calves under 550 lbs. traded $6 to as much as $10 higher compared to seven days earlier. Improving feedlot margins were the main factor driving the feeder market. June and August live cattle futures



(Photo courtesy Canada Beef Inc.)

Klassen: Feeder cattle prices digesting uncertainty

Defensive tone likely through January

The feeder cattle market was very quiet during the last week of December with auction barns in holiday mode. There were discussions regarding direct sales but no actual business was confirmed. The stakes are too high given the market uncertainty; a defensive tone will likely continue throughout January. Feed grains continue to percolate higher; the

Cattle hold steady with fall run winding down

Cattle hold steady with fall run winding down

Barley and wheat values are stronger, pressuring cattle values farther west

As the fall run continues at Manitoba’s cattle auctions, prices held steady, according to Tyler Slawinski, an auctioneer at the Ashern and Ste. Rose auction marts. “The fall run is still booming. We were full on; Ashern had nearly 2,900 and Ste. Rose had almost 2,600,” he said. Province-wide, auctions sold more than 15,000 head



CME January 2021 feeder cattle with 20-, 50- and 100-day moving averages. (Barchart)

Klassen: Feeder market digests rising COVID-19 cases

Compared to last week, western Canadian yearling prices were relatively unchanged while calves traded steady to $2 lower on average. The grain harvest is in its final stages and buying interest was noted from the farmer/backgrounding operator. The buying frenzy over yearlings has eased and finishing feedlots were active on all weight categories. Feather-light calves

(Photo courtesy Canada Beef Inc.)

Klassen: Yearling market remains red hot

Barley harvest well underway in southern Alberta

Compared to last week, western Canadian yearling prices were $2-$4 higher on average; however, in southern Alberta, yearlings traded $6-$8 above week-ago levels. A few auction barns in Alberta held their first feature sales of the fall run and buyers showed up with both hands. The quality of yearlings coming off grass is excellent and