GFM Network News


Editorial: The ‘free’ market

Over the years a lot of ink has been spilled about the “indefensible” supply-managed system in Canada, to quote just one recent article from the Globe & Mail newspaper. There’s a certain similarity to the arguments against the status quo. Some say the system is nothing but a price-fixing cartel or closed-shop union. Others liken

Loblaw, Weston bake the numbers, burn consumers

Loblaw, Weston bake the numbers, burn consumers

As shocking as it was, most of us will eventually forget Loblaw’s admission of price-fixing. Let’s hope the industry doesn’t


Most Canadians were stunned and dismayed to learn that the country’s leading grocer was caught up in a price-fixing scheme with bread maker George Weston Ltd., which is owned by the same company. The scheme lasted from 2001 to 2015. As a result, Loblaw Companies fired several people and gave $25 gift certificates to millions


Chicago style hot dog with deli mustard and green relish

Bakers, farmers struggle to make a little dough

A poor crop is wreaking havoc on bakers and creating market opportunities for high-protein wheat

Chicago’s iconic sandwiches — Italian beef heroes dripping with gravy, and hotdogs loaded with pickles and hot peppers — wouldn’t be such culinary institutions without the bread. But this fall, bakers faced a crisis getting the right kind of bread to delis and sandwich shops locally and across the United States. Gonnella Baking Co. —

Scott Stothers (l to r), Loic Perrot, Tabitha Langel, and Doug Cattani with bread made from Kernza.

Making bread — and maybe history too

The first loaves of bread made from Kernza have been gobbled up in Manitoba

You won’t be buying Kernza bread in a Manitoba bakery or grocery store any time soon, but a small group of proponents see it as a sign of things to come. Guests at a small reception at the Tall Grass Prairie Bakery in downtown Winnipeg Nov. 23 were treated to loaves of freshly baked sourdough

Flour ground from dried crickets and crickets in jars, for the first mass-delivered bread made of insects, are seen at the Finnish food company Fazer bakery in Helsinki, Finland on Nov. 23, 2017. (Photo: Reuters/Attila Cser)

Finnish baker launches bread made from crushed crickets

Helsinki | Reuters — Finnish bakery and food service company Fazer launched on Thursday what it said was the world’s first insect-based bread to be offered to consumers in stores. The bread, made from flour ground from dried crickets as well as wheat flour and seeds, contains more protein than normal wheat bread. Each loaf


(Stephen Ausmus photo courtesy ARS/USDA)

Major retailers say federal bread pricing probe underway

Major Canadian grocery retailers Metro and Loblaw say a federal investigation is underway concerning the pricing of certain commercial bread products. Toronto-based Loblaw and its parent firm, George Weston Ltd., announced Tuesday they’re aware of an “industry-wide investigation” by the federal Competition Bureau concerning a “price-fixing scheme involving certain packaged bread products.” The two companies

Esey Assefaw, Cigi’s head of Asian produc ts and pasta technology, speaks to a technical exchange group from the Philippines at Cigi.

Cigi coaxes Philippines back into the fold

Cigi is wooing Filipino millers after a period of poor gluten strength 
and low protein drove them to American wheat suppliers

For years Darwin Tatel used Canadian wheat at the San Miguel Mill in Batangas, Philippines, but then something changed. “We stopped using CWRS awhile back when we encountered some problems in terms of quality,” said the head miller, who was in Winnipeg to take part in a technical exchange program at the Canadian International Grains

Country’s largest bread company says quality of Canadian wheat must improve

Gluten additives to offset the protein shortfall cost the company $1 million last year alone

Canada’s biggest bread maker is struggling with the inconsistent quality of Canadian milling wheat. Connie Morrison, Canada Bread’s vice-president of marketing, told reporters on the sidelines of the Canada Global Crops Symposium in Winnipeg April 12 that Canada’s reputation for providing the Cadillac of wheat is slipping. “Everybody viewed Canadian wheat as the gold standard


Elaine Sopiwnyk (l) and Ashok Sarkar have completed a year-long project looking at how to co-mill wheat and barley.

Cigi looking to expand barley’s role

The ability to make barley-related health claims is helping drive the development of new, healthier flours

The term ‘barley sandwich’ is about to get a whole lot more literal. The Canadian International Grains institute, better known as Cigi, has completed a year-long project examining how blending barley into traditional wheat flour could improve both nutritional properties and milling performance. On its own, barley can be difficult to mill, often clumping and

Manitobans invited to farm dinner with 3F theme – Farm, Fish & Forage

DIY Homesteader Festival includes contestant from Top Chef Canada

You can fight with the weeds in your garden or you can invite one of Canada’s top chefs to cook with them. That’s the perspective of DIY Homesteader Festival organizers who are capping this year’s festival on June 6 with a unique farm-to-table event featuring the best our farms, fishermen and foragers have to offer.