GFM Network News


CBOT weekly outlook: Wheat futures underpinned for now

However, traders still watching headlines

MarketsFarm — U.S. wheat futures have climbed higher over the past week, with the largest gains in Chicago Board of Trade soft wheat, as global uncertainty over the COVID-19 pandemic provided some support. However, that uncertainty could also makes predicting market trends rather difficult, according to an analyst. “All of my comments come with a



North America’s millers, bakers scramble to satisfy bread binge

Chicago/Winnipeg | Reuters — North American flour mills and bakeries are rushing to boost production as the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus leads to consumer stockpiling of staples such as bread and pasta. The virus’ spread prompted orders to stay at home in some U.S. states, including New York, California and Illinois last week, following

U.S. grains: Wheat jumps to one-month top

Soy climbs, corn little changed

Chicago | Reuters — U.S. wheat futures surged nearly four per cent on Monday and hit a one-month high, buoyed by strong buying by domestic flour millers as consumers stockpile bread, and signs of a pick-up in global export business, traders said. Soybeans rose on expectations of rising demand for soymeal, a feed ingredient. Corn

Sudan to continue to subsidize bread but with ‘justice’

Khartoum | Reuters — Sudan will continue to subsidize bread prices during transitional rule after Omar al-Bashir’s ouster but wants to achieve “justice” in distributing income supports, its trade and industry minister said on Wednesday. Bread shortages, caused by difficulties in raising hard currency to import wheat, triggered mass protests which — with the help


World’s oldest bread found at prehistoric site in Jordan

Washington | Reuters — Charred remains of a flatbread baked about 14,500 years ago in a stone fireplace at a site in northeastern Jordan have given researchers a delectable surprise: people began making bread, a vital staple food, millennia before they developed agriculture. No matter how you slice it, the discovery detailed on Monday shows

Youth learn cooking skills at the North Dakota 4-H Camp.

Rediscover cooking and baking this summer

Measuring cups and spoons, and digital temperature gauges take the guesswork out of modern cooking and baking

I thought back in time as I drove by the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center recently. I had reached the rolling hills near Washburn, N.D., on my way to the North Dakota 4-H Camp. Captain Meriwether Lewis and Lieutenant William Clark and their crew built Fort Mandan in the Washburn area in November 1804. The

Editorial: The ‘free’ market

Over the years a lot of ink has been spilled about the “indefensible” supply-managed system in Canada, to quote just one recent article from the Globe & Mail newspaper. There’s a certain similarity to the arguments against the status quo. Some say the system is nothing but a price-fixing cartel or closed-shop union. Others liken


Loblaw, Weston bake the numbers, burn consumers

As shocking as it was, most of us will eventually forget Loblaw’s admission of price-fixing. Let’s hope the industry doesn’t


Most Canadians were stunned and dismayed to learn that the country’s leading grocer was caught up in a price-fixing scheme with bread maker George Weston Ltd., which is owned by the same company. The scheme lasted from 2001 to 2015. As a result, Loblaw Companies fired several people and gave $25 gift certificates to millions

A Chicago-style hotdog just wouldn’t be the same without the right bun.

Bakers, farmers struggle to make a little dough

A poor crop is wreaking havoc on bakers and creating market opportunities for high-protein wheat

Chicago’s iconic sandwiches — Italian beef heroes dripping with gravy, and hotdogs loaded with pickles and hot peppers — wouldn’t be such culinary institutions without the bread. But this fall, bakers faced a crisis getting the right kind of bread to delis and sandwich shops locally and across the United States. Gonnella Baking Co. —