GFM Network News


Inoculants to encourage pulse crops to nodulate are a familiar form of biological product.

Biologicals in agriculture: what’s old is new (and improved)

Farmers have a centuries-long tradition of using biologicals whether they called it that or not

The term ‘agricultural biologicals’ conjures up images of white lab coats and test tubes. But the practice itself — deriving benefits from naturally occurring micro-organisms — predates the scientific method itself. Centuries ago, long before they knew anything about rhizobia or nitrogen fixing, farmers were reaping the benefits of the process by rotating legumes in

Biostimulants: What’s in the box?

When it comes to biostimulants there are plenty of questions but few clear answers

Biostimulants are one of the fastest-growing parts of the agriculture input market. A lot of products are on the market worldwide and many are being aggressively marketed. They’re being touted for their soil health benefits and other traits, but often little evidence is offered. Carl Rosen, a professor and extension soil scientist with the University


Managing microbes

Taking a page from pulse production, beneficial soil microbes are under the microscope

One of the biostimulant areas receiving the most attention is soil microbes, something that already has a long history in agriculture. The most obvious example is soybean and other pulse crops that are inoculated with rhizobia to ensure they efficiently fix nitrogen from the atmosphere. It’s an area that’s growing fast thanks to advances in