GFM Network News


A few small changes can compound and really build the bottom line of cow-calf operations.

Time to sweat the small things

Eking out a little improvement here and there may pay off exponentially for cow-calf producers

Contrary to what most learned in elementary school, two plus two does not always equal four. Instead, according to Robyn Paddison, research analyst with CanFax, small changes to a cow-calf operation can be much more the sum of their parts when it comes to the bottom line. Why it matters: Small, simultaneous changes to production,

Klassen: Calf prices ratcheting higher

Compared to last week, western Canadian yearling markets traded $2-$4 on either side of unchanged; mid-weight calves were also unchanged while lighter calves traded steady to as much as $6 higher. Alberta and Saskatchewan have experienced adverse weather over the past couple of weeks; however, feedlots in southern Alberta appeared to be more aggressive for


Cattle producers have lofty new goals in the run-up to 2030.

Beef sector aims for new 2030 targets

The beef operation of 2030 will have a smaller environmental footprint,better grazing ecosystems and greater efficiency

The Canadian beef industry has new benchmarks to strive for in the next decade. The organizations involved in Canada’s National Beef Strategy — the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association, Canada Beef Breeds Council, Beef Cattle Research Council, Canada Beef, The National Cattle Feeders’ Association, Canadian Meat Council and Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef — have announced a




In the tight-margin business of raising cattle, a host of smaller factors is pulling down profitability – and herd numbers along with it.

Cattle sector facing silent crisis

The cattle sector isn’t facing one big crisis, but rather the cumulative effect of many challenges, a new study says

Canada’s cattle industry may not be facing another near-fatal blow like BSE, but it’s hemorrhaging all the same. And this time, it’s a death by a thousand cuts, says a new study from the heart of Canada’s cattle country. Government regulations. Global trade wars. Rising land prices and ever-higher costs. Drought. Feed shortages. Head taxes

A sampling of the burger options (Big Mac, cheeseburger and Quarter Pounder) available from McDonald’s Canada.

Comment: McDonald’s and the great protein betrayal

Many will feel abandoned by a company that long-championed livestock producers


When McDonald’s makes a move, everyone pays attention. That’s just the way things are in the food-service industry. For months, rumours were swirling around McDonald’s and when it would launch a plant-based product. We now know McDonald’s will enter the plant-based game by running a pilot in Ontario. The pilot project will last 12 weeks.

Brazil beef plants set for Chinese inspections

Amid swine fever outbreak, China seeks new protein sources

Chinese health inspectors are evaluating four Brazilian beef plants as part of a push to approve new meat exporters amid an outbreak of swine fever, two people familiar with the matter told Reuters. Marfrig Global Foods SA owns one of the plants, located in the town of Várzea Grande in Mato Grosso state, according to


Klassen: Feeder cattle market remains volatile

Western Canadian yearling markets appeared to stabilize after coming under pressure earlier in the month. Compared to last week, yearling prices were unchanged to $4 higher on average while calf markets traded $2-$3 on either side of unchanged. Major feedlots were more aggressive for 800-plus-lb. cattle as feed grain prices continue to grind lower. Favourable