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University Works With Fossil Group

The University of Manitoba and the Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre (CFDC) recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding that will see the two organizations work together on a broad array of academic and research programs.

“CFDC’s decades of hard work and dedication toward fossil discovery, research, and educational programming are starting to pay huge rewards. Our organization has been developing this resource for the last 40 years,” said board president Harry Penner. “We are so pleased to now be working in co-operation with the University of Manitoba to advance our joint interest in higher education and quality academic research.”

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“The rich geology and 80-million-year-old marine fossil assemblage associated with the CFDC are unique resources within Canada. This collaboration thus generates exciting new opportunities for students and staff alike at the University of Manitoba,” adds Dr. Digvir S. Jayas, vice-president (research) at the University of Manitoba.

The agreement provides a plat form for the CFDC and the university to work together to develop academic programs and courses; coordinate staff and students for lab-and field-orientated teaching, research and training projects; collaborate on joint research, publication, and academic events; and exchange documentation and research expertise.

“This partnership offers a diverse range of hands-on research and education possibilities for our students and faculty. The centre’s impressive fossil collection is widely used by scientists nationally and internationally, and we are delighted to foster its continued development,” said Jayas.

The Canadian Fossil Discovery Centre houses the largest collection of marine reptile fossils in Canada, inc luding a 43-foot -long mosasaur named “Bruce,” the largest mosasaur in the country. Housed in Morden’s Access Event Centre, the CFDC is working towards building a new state-of-the-art facility in the Manitoba Escarpment.

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