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New Winter Wheat Varieties Coming Soon

Long-Term Yield Data & Variety Description Table

Site Years Tested

Resistance to:

Relative Winter Hardiness

CDC Falcon

100

60

0

26

VG

G

G

F

CDC Raptor

98

55

+ 4

29

VG

VG

G

G

Radiant~

96

37

+ 7

30

VG

VP

VP

VG

CDC Ptarmigan

104

20

+ 3

34

F

P

P

G

Varieties that are being tested or proposed for registration DH99W18I*45 96

Check variety CDC Falcon averaged 82 bu./acre over 60 site years

4

+ 2

~ Indicates a variety that is protected by Plant Breeder’s Rights or a variety where protection has been applied for but not yet granted at time of printing.

32

VG

VG

VG

G

Variety

Yield % of CDC Falcon

Days to Maturity +/-CDC Falcon Height (inches) Lodging Stem Rust Leaf Rust

Canada Western Red Winter CDC Buteo 101 47 + 4 30 G G G VG

CDC Harrier 102 46 + 4 34 G G P G

McClintock~ 98 54 + 5 33 VG VG G F

Canada Western General Purpose Accipiter~ 105 4 + 3 29 VG VG G G

Peregrine~ 112 4 + 2 36 G VG G VG

Thinking of growing winter wheat this year? Haven’t decided which variety to grow? Wondering how the new varieties in the Canada Western General Purpose wheat class perform in Manitoba? To assist farmers with variety decisions this fall, Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives (MAFRI) and MCVET (Manitoba Crop Variety Evaluation Team) is publishing the most recent variety descriptions and performance data for winter wheat, which includes data collected in 2009.

YIELD POTENTIAL

Yield is based on the genetic potential and environmental conditions in which the crop is grown. Farmers should look at long-term, multi-site data and select those varieties that perform well not only in their area but across experimental sites and years. This will increase the likelihood that the variety selected will perform well under next year’s environmental conditions.

VARIETY Canada Western Red Winter

2009 Yield Comparison Table

CDC Buteo

CDC Falcon

CDC Raptor

McClintock~

Radiant~

Canada Western General Purpose Accipiter~

CDC Ptarmigan

Peregrine~

2009 Average Yield

100

100

103

96

95

105

99

112

Varieties that are being tested or proposed for registration DH99W18I*45 96 95

Check (CDC Falcon) Yield in bu./ac. CV (%)

LSD %

Significant differences b/n varieties

2009 Yield by Test Location

Boissevain Hartney Stonewall

94

100

107

100

98

111

109

108

76 5.5

10 Yes

101

100

109

108

94

101

108

122

88

90 13.3

-No

106

100

96

86

96

104

95

110

100

69 10.3

-No

~ Indicates a variety that is protected by Plant Breeder’s Rights or a variety where protection has been applied for but not yet granted at time of printing.

Winnipeg

99

100

97

91

92

104

88

107

101

102 5.7

10 Yes

In looking at the Long-Term Yield Data & Variety Description Table, the yield potential of the winter wheat varieties tested by MCVET is similar. The “site years tested” column shows the number of trials where the entry has been compared to the check, CDC Falcon. The more site years the variety is tested, the more dependable the data.

While data from single sites is often more interesting, individual site data, and even data accumulated over numerous sites in a single year must always be viewed with caution; varieties that excel under one set of environmental conditions may not perform as well under the next year’s conditions. When looking at the Yield Comparison Table, the grey shaded area lists the yield of CDC Falcon in bu./ acre below each site. CV is the Coefficient of Variation and it is an indicator of how uniform a trial is; the smaller the CV, the greater the chance that true differences were found between varieties in the trial. LSD stands for Least Significant Difference and it shows the percentage that individual varieties must differ by to be considered significantly different.

LOOK AT THE TOTAL PACKAGE, NOT JUST YIELD

Although yield is generally the first information looked at, farmers also need to compare varieties for maturity, height, standability and resistance to disease in selecting a variety that is best suited to their farm. After variety selection, emphasis must be put on planting high-quality seed. Consider planting certified seed to take advantage of the variety’s full genetic potential.

WINTER HARDINESS

Mother Nature has the final say on the harshness of our winters. Variety selection can be one tool in the tool box used to help winter wheat survive. Relative winter hardiness ratings presented in the variety description table are derived from data presented at time of registration as well as grower experience. For the newer varieties such as CDC Ptarmigan, Accipiter, Peregrine and the unregistered line of DH99W181*45, there is limited information available as yet. As varieties are grown on more acres in commercial production, a better understanding of winter hardiness will follow. However, the winter wheat varieties available for production in Manitoba all have good winter hardiness if no-till seeded into standing stubble. Farmers should also use other best management practices to help ensure winter survival such as seeding on time, seeding shallow, using starter fertilizer, and employing a weed management program in the fall.

CONSIDER MARKETS OR END-USE

Is the winter wheat being grown for feed or for milling purposes? Certain varieties are eligible for an Identity-Preserved program through the Canadian Wheat Board due to their baking quality. CDC Buteo, McClintock and Radiant are eligible for the Canadian Wheat Board’s 2009-10 Canada Western Red Winter Select wheat program. Producers who market their winter wheat through the feed market may consider, but are not limited to these varieties. Regardless of their market, farmers will have to sign the “Declaration of eligibility for the class” form when they deliver to a commercial handler. By signing the form, they are attesting that the wheat they are delivering is eligible for a specific class of western Canadian wheat.

MORE WINTER WHEAT VARIETIES COMING IN THE FUTURE

A number of winter wheat varieties were supported for registration at the annual Prairie Grain Development Committee meeting. Plans are currently underway to test four new winter wheat varieties in the 2009-10 MCVET winter wheat trials.

Farmers should continually evaluate the performances of old and new varieties, using available data and speaking with experienced growers and extension professionals. Seed Manitoba will continue to provide the latest unbiased information on new and established winter wheat varieties across Manitoba. Seed Manitoba is a collaborative effort between the Manitoba Seed Growers’ A s s o c i a t i o n , Ma n i t o b a Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives and the Manitoba Co-operator. Data for all crops will be published in Seed Manitoba 2010 this December.

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