Growing a 4-H garden you can ‘Bee Proud’ of

4-H clubs can get free seeds to 
plant pollinator-friendly gardens

4-H Canada and Syngenta Canada have announced the second year of Proud to Bee a 4-H’er, an initiative where 4-H club members learn about bees and other pollinators by planting and tending pollinator-friendly gardens.

Participating 4-H clubs will create bee-friendly habitats using Proud to Bee a 4-H’er bee-friendly seed packets.

4-H clubs that register for the program receive a free Proud to Bee a 4-H’er garden bag stuffed with bee-friendly seed packets, planting instructions, and information about pollinator habitat. The activity encourages 4-H members to learn all about the amazing and fascinating work of bees, to get outside and enjoy nature, and to raise funds for their local clubs.

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“The importance of pollinator-friendly habitats to the ongoing health of bees and other insects should not be underestimated,” says Dr. Paul Hoekstra, regulatory and science stewardship manager with Syngenta Canada. “The quantity and quality of food sources available to pollinators is a key determinant of overall population health and an important part of maintaining and enhancing biodiversity.”

Syngenta support for Proud to Bee a 4-H’er is through its Operation Pollinator program, which is focused on research and other initiatives that contribute to enhanced biodiversity and habitat in support of healthy pollinator populations.

4-H’ers can plant the seeds themselves or use them to support activities in their communities. Last year’s effort was highly successful with more than 100 clubs taking part and nearly 78,000 seed packets distributed across Canada for planting.

“Proud to Bee was a great experience for our members last year,” said 4-H Canada CEO, Shannon Benner. “This year, Syngenta Canada has renewed its commitment to giving 4-H’ers a great opportunity to not only learn more about pollinators but to get together and take an active role in supporting pollinator health in their communities.”

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