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In Brief… – for Oct. 28, 2010

Honoured:Solanyl Biopolymers Inc. of Carberry was awarded Emerging Life Science Company of the Year Agribusiness by the Life Science Association of Manitoba (LSAM) at its annual dinner on Oct. 4.

Solanyl manufactures starch-based biodegradable plastic resin. Founders Derek and Earl McLaren formed the company in 2005 to further process the byproduct streams of local Manitoba food processors.

It received approximately $76,000 in federal funding through the Manitoba Rural Adaptation Council (MRAC). – Staff Drought relief:The federal government is offering tax deferrals to cattle producers in an expanded list of municipalities suffering from drought in Alberta and British Columbia. The tax deferral allows eligible producers in designated areas to defer income tax on the sale of breeding livestock for one year to help replenish breeding stock in the following year. Northern Alberta experienced very dry conditions, well below-normal temperature and low precipitation, resulting in very poor soil moisture conditions and pasture and forage development. – AAFC release Chinese settlers

remembered:The federal government is giving the Westman Chinese Association $50,000 through the Community Historical Recognition Program to establish a monument commemorating the experiences of early Chinese settlers in Manitoba. “This monument will stand as a testament to those who persevered in the face of policies such as the Head Tax and the Chinese Exclusion Act, actions that were legal at the time but which do not fit the values we hold in Canada today,” said Brandon-Souris MP Merv Tweed.

– Staff

Honey drops create a buzz:

A Prince Edward Island processor has won the grand prize for the most innovative and successful new product at the world’s largest international trade show, Global SIAL (Salon International de l’Alimentation) d’Or in France. The Honibe Honey Drop, created by Abbey Foods Ltd., is the world’s first 100 per cent pure dried honey made without any additives or preservatives. In taking home the international grand prize on October 18, the honey drops beat out over 250 other products. – Staff Nominations please:

The Manitoba Agricultural Hall of Fame is accepting nominations for deserving individuals who have made a significant contribution to agriculture and their community until Oct. 31. For more information and nomination forms, please contact:

Pat Bailey, Executive Director 1129 Queens Avenue Brandon, Man. R7A 1L9 Phone: 204-728-3736 Fax: 204-726-6260 Email: [email protected] WTO’s COOL panel opens session to public:The next “substantive” meeting over U. S. mandatory country-of-origin labelling (COOL) to be held between Canada, Mexico and the U. S. at the World Trade Organization’s Dispute Settlement Body will be open to the public at the participating countries’ request. The WTO last week said the session, set for Dec. 1 and 2, will be available for viewing to registered guests by way of closed-circuit TV in a separate viewing room at WTO headquarters in Geneva. The WTO agreed in May to set up the panel on COOL after Canada’s request in October 2009. Missouri soybean grower cracks record:A southwestern Missouri farmer is the first to crack the 160 bu./ac. mark for soybean yield. Kip Cullers was recently confirmed – again – as the world record holder on Oct. 12 by the Missouri Soybean Association after the weigh check from his Sept. 28 harvest was verified by a third-party official. The MSA said the yield shows the capacity new varieties can obtain. Cullers planted the crop April 14, putting in Pioneer variety 94Y71 on an irrigated, conventionally tilled field. Missouri soybean fields typically run about 40 bu./ac., the MSA said. Cargill backs community projects:Cargill has launched a new outreach program in which Prairie 4-H clubs can develop projects of positive impact in their home communities. The promotion was announced last week and dubbed the Reaping Returns Community Outreach Program. Participating 4-H project teams are eligible to receive up to $2,500 for projects that focus on “health and nutrition, education and/or the environment.” The company will also consider the projects for matching funds from its Cargill Cares program. Details are at www.victorycanola.com. Chinese settlers

remembered:The federal government is giving the Westman Chinese Association $50,000 through the Community Historical Recognition Program to establish a monument commemorating the experiences of early Chinese settlers in Manitoba. “This monument will stand as a testament to those who persevered in the face of policies such as the Head Tax and the Chinese Exclusion Act, actions that were legal at the time but which do not fit the values we hold in Canada today,” said Brandon-Souris MP Merv Tweed.

– Staff

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