Food Freedom Day marked February 8

Canadian Federation of Agriculture planning more activities to highlight agriculture’s contributions 
as country marks 150th anniversary of confederation

It took just 39 days in 2017 to earn enough income to pay the annual grocery bill, according to the Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) which marked Food Freedom Day Feb. 8.

To calculate the date, the CFA compares food expenditures against average income and pro-rates this to represent calendar days.

Food Freedom Day is how the CFA highlights Canada’s consistent ranking worldwide for the lowest food costs. Canadians spent the third-lowest share of their total expenditures on food.

As Canada also gears up to mark its 150 anniversary of confederation, the CFA is also setting out plans for an ongoing series of activities highlighting the positive contributions of agriculture, including capturing of 150 stories from Canadian farmers.

“As Canada approaches its 150th birthday, we’ll take a close look at the relationships between Canadians, their food, and farming communities,” said CFA president Ron Bonnett in a news release.

“Agriculture is at the heart of Canada. Many family farms helped to form our communities, and we’re eager to show that farms are woven into our national fabric,” he said.

An initial publication for the “Canada 150: Our Farms. Our Food. Our Future” campaign has now been released for use in promotional and educational settings which highlights that:

  • One in eight jobs in Canada is linked to agriculture. There are 2.1 million Canadians employed in the agriculture and agri-food industry.
  • Agriculture represented 6.6 per cent of Canada’s gross domestic product in 2014. The agriculture and agri-food system generated $108 billion.
  • Agricultural greenhouse gas emissions intensity improved by 33.5 per cent from 1990 to 2013. While production continues to grow, agriculture saw a decrease in greenhouse gas emissions from 2005 to 2014 of two megatonnes.

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