First new-crop lambs arrive for the year

The Winnipeg Livestock Auction March 15 sold 400 sheep and goats, for the approaching Easter season. Future producers were bidding to improve or increase their spring herds, while the meat industry was bidding for the Easter purposes.

Age of the ewes was very important as was illustrated with the bidding at this sale. The price range was lower for the older ewes than the last sale. There appeared to be no correlation between weight and the price bid on the ewes. The price ranged from $0.77 to $1.17 per pound. The extreme elderly or culled ewes showed a much lower price range of $0.20 to $0.68 per pound.

There was an average selection of rams. The demand for the lighter rams, was more constant giving a price range of $1.07 to $1.15 per pound. The lighter-weight rams ranged from 155 to 193 pounds. The bidding on the much heavier rams was lower than those of the light-weight range.

The 240-pound Suffolk-cross ram brought $211.20 ($0.88 per pound). The 250-pound Suffolk (purebred — with papers), brought $242.50 ($0.97 per pound).

Heavier lambs were receiving the lower bidding. The 135-pound Rideau-cross lamb brought $162 ($1.20 per pound). The group of four 113-pound Cheviot- and Rideau-cross lambs brought $190.97 ($1.69 per pound).

A limited number of lambs delivered for the market lamb classification, at this sale. The price range for these lambs, brought $1.70 to $1.85 per pound. The 105-pound Barbado-cross Katahdin lamb might have been the novelty lamb for this classification, but the bidding did not illustrate major interest. This colourful lamb brought $86.63 ($0.825 per pound).

Feeder lambs dominated this sale. The hair lambs received the lower-price bidding although the price difference was very small in comparison. These hair lambs brought $1.79 to $1.87 per pound. The feeder lamb price ranged from $1.79 to $2.18 per pound.

The interest for the lightweight lambs continued with this major price bidding. The selection of the lambs was near the feeder lamb numbers. Lambs in the 74- to 78-pound range, brought a price range of $1.775 to $2.23 per pound.

Lambs in the 63- to 68-pound range, brought a price range of $2.13 to $2.20 per pound.

Once again, the novelty lambs did not carry the same bidding interest. The 50-pound Cheviot-cross lamb, brought $116.25 ($2.325 per pound). While two 50-pound white-faced Jacob lambs, brought $1.425 per pound. Then there was a group of 10, 53-pound Jacob lambs, that brought $77.38 ($1.46 per pound).

Two 48-pound Barbado-cross lambs, brought $92.40 ($1.925 per pound).

This sale (March 15, 2012); sold the first new-crop lambs appearance for the year. The quality and health of these 55-pound lambs seemed to be good. These new-crop lambs brought $141.63 ($2.575 per pound).

The bidding interest for the lighter-weight goat does, produced a higher price than even the last sale. The one Boer-cross doe of last sale, brought $1.13 per pound. In this sale, the price ranged from $1.03 to $1.95 per pound. Even a large 90-pound framed Pygmy-cross doe, brought $97 ($1.39 per pound). As what could and would be expected, the culls and the aged does received a much lower price range of $0.83 to $0.91 per pound.

The selection for bucks might have been limited at this sale. The lighter-weight bucks attracted the higher price range compared to the heavier bucks. The price ranged from $1.18 to $1.55 per pound. The Pygmy-cross bucks, brought a price range from $1.15 to $1.53 per pound. An exception was a feisty little Pygmy-cross buck, brought $1.81 per pound.

Goat kids dominated the selection of goats once again for this sale. Strong bidding was present for all the lighter-weight goats (kids), and no breed dominated — so the selection was good. Goats in the weight range of 70 to 78 pounds, brought a price range of $1.68 to $1.94 per pound.

The 60- to 65-pound goats, brought a price range of $1.93 to $2.08 per pound.

The 50- to 55-pound goats, brought a price range of $1.66 to $2.11 per pound.

The 40- to 48-pound goats, brought a price range of $1.88 to $2.14 per pound.

The bidding on the goats in the next lower-weight classification, had no apparent direct relationship on the weight. Possible reasoning is focused on the breed of goat, at this sale. A 35-pound Saanen-cross kid, brought $42.50 ($1.21 per pound). While 35-pound Alpine- and Boer-cross kids, brought $71 ($2.03 per pound). Then a noisy little 30-pound Pygmy-cross kid, brought $45 ($1.50 per pound).

Seven 29-pound Boer-cross kids, brought $60 ($2.07 per pound).

The Ontario Stockyard Report (March 12, 2012), stated the lamb classifications sold at a constant rate from last week. However, due to the large numbers delivered, the prices were moderate. The sheep and goats were not as numerous, so the bidding was stronger — creating a higher price.

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