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Soaked Pastures Muddy Improved Markets

The Manitoba cattle industry is expected to get stronger. However, producers are looking for better weather for pasture conditions to improve and for feed grain prices to stay low, according to an official with the Manitoba Cattle Producers Association.

During the week ended June 25, cattle movement was said to be steady considering the industry is in its annual seasonal summer lull. Prices for the cattle marketed were also steady while demand from local producers increased, MCPA president Jay Fox said.

Demand from packers is starting to grow along with the Canadian global economy, as consumers are purchasing pricier cuts, he said.

“As people find a little bit more money in their pockets they are willing to buy something more than just hamburger, including prime steaks and cuts like that,” said Fox, who added that meat retail sales influence packer demand.

The price of cattle marketed has also seen an increase lately due to a world shortage in the number of breeding cattle, according to Fox.

“A lot of producers are unable to make it work and they’re selling out. A lot of producers are older and they’re not willing to take the risk anymore,” said Fox, noting a shortage of breeding cattle in Brazil, Australia, some south African countries, Canada and the U. S.

However, the rise in prices due to the shortage of cattle and the increased demand from local producers and packers might be countered due to low production of feed grains as well as poor pasture conditions.

Excess moisture continues in the province and some pasture land, such as in the southwestern regions, is flooded, putting restrictions on grazing cattle, he noted.

“It’s not so much water, it’s muddy and cows don’t generally like to be dirty so they try to stay to the high ridges. If it’s a long wet season it is harder for them to get the good gains on the grass that they need to,” Fox said.

Moisture conditions also have the potential to impact feed prices. Due to unseeded acres and lower expected yields, feed grains will be in short supply, instilling rising costs for producers.

“We want to see grain producers grow the barley crop, and have a strong feed grain crop. We’re cautiously optimistic that things will work out, that there will be enough feed grains out there this fall,” said Fox.

FROM THE AUCTION FLOORS

Note: All prices in Canadian dollars per hundredweight (cwt). These prices also generally represent the top one-third of sales reported by the auction yard.

Ashern Livestock Mart: Closed until mid August.

Gladstone Auction Mart: Too few cattle were marketed this week for a report. The last auction for the summer will be July 13 and Gladstone will open again Aug. 16.

Grunthal Livestock Auction Mart: A report is not available due the small number of cattle at the auction. Auctions will be held every other week in July and August.

Heartland Livestock Services, Brandon: A total of 260 cattle were on offer in Brandon during the week.

A1-A2 steers traded from $78 to $81.50; A1-A2 heifers, $78-$80.75; D1-D2 cows, $52-$56, age-verified $55-$60; feeder cows, $45-$52; shells, $30-$44; and good bulls, $70-$73.75.

Feeder steers weighing 900-1,000 lbs. sold from $85 to $93.50; 800-900 lbs., $92-$99.50; 700-800 lbs., $100-$106; 600-700 lbs., $105-$116; and 500-600 lbs., $108-$118.50.

Feeder heifers weighing 800-900 lbs. sold from $85 to $90; 700-800 lbs., $90-$98.25; 600-700 lbs., $95-$107.50 and 500-600 lbs., $100-$108.50.

Auctions will be held every Tuesday during the summer.

Heartland Livestock Services, Virden: There were about 497 cattle sold at the sale held June 23.

Butcher steers brought $77-$81.75 while butcher heifers sold from $76 to $79. Ageverified/ young cows sold from $57 to $61.25; D1-D2 cows, $55-$59; D3 cows, $51-$55; shelly cows, $47-$51; and mature bulls, $68-$73.

Feeder steers weighing 900-1,000 lbs. brought $87-$96; 800-900 lbs., $94-$102.75; 700-800 lbs., $98-$112; 600-700 lbs., $105-$118; 500-600 lbs., $110-$125; and 400-500 lbs., $110-$125.

Feeder heifers weighing 900-1,000 lbs. traded from $77 to $87; 800-900 lbs., $84-$93; 700-800 lbs., $88-$99; 600-700 lbs., $97-$107; 500-600 lbs., $100-$109; and 400-500 lbs., $100-$111.

Auctions will be held every Wednesday during the summer.

Killarney Auction Mart: Closed until mid-August.

Pipestone Livestock Sales: Closed until the end of August.

Ste. Rose Auction Mart: A total of 254 cattle were sold at the June 24 sale. In the slaughter market, D1 and D2 cows ranged from $45 to $52; D3-D4 cows, $33-$45; and bulls, $73-$79.75.

Feeder steers weighing 800-900 lbs. traded from $90 to $101.50; 700-800 lbs., $90-$112.50; and 400-500 lbs., $115-$126.

Feeder heifers weighing 700-800 lbs. went for $90-$104.50; 600-700 lbs., $105-$112.50; 500-600 lbs., $105-$114; and 400-500 lbs., $110.

The next sale will be on Aug. 12.

Taylor Auctions, Melita: The sale held June 24 resulted in 145 slaughter cattle and 61 feeders being sold.

In the slaughter market, A1-A2 steers over 1,000 lbs. brought $78-$83; A1-A2 heifers over 850 lbs., $76-$81.75; D1 and D2 cows, $52-$63.50; D3 and D5 cows, $40-$51.50; and good bulls, $62-$75.75.

Feeder steers weighing 900-1,000 lbs., brought $85-$96.75; 800-900 lbs., $86-$98.50; 700-800 lbs., $88-$104; 600-700 lbs., $90-$104.50; 500-600 lbs., $92-$108; 400-500 lbs., $95-$112; and 300-400 lbs., $95-$110.

Feeder heifers weighing 800-900 lbs. traded from $83 to $94.50; 700-800 lbs., $85-$99.50; 600-700 lbs., $87-$104.50; 500-600 lbs., $88-$106; 400-500 lbs., $90-$108; and 300-400 lbs., $90-$105.

The next sale will be held Aug. 19.

Winnipeg Livestock Sales: There were about 416 head of cattle sold during the week ending June 25. In the slaughter market, choice steers and heifers sold from $79 to $82.25; dry fed cows, $47-$50; good fleshed, $43-$47; lean, $36-$43; young age-verified, $47-$58; and good bulls, $60-$76.25.

Feeder steers weighing over 1,000 lbs. brought $84-$88.50; 900-1,000 lbs., $88-$92; 700-800 lbs., $98-$104.50; and 600-700 lbs., $106-$120.

Feeder heifers weighing 900-1,000 lbs. traded from $80 to $87.75; 800-900 lbs., $85-$90; 700-800 lbs., $90-$96; 600-700 lbs., $95-$103; and 500-600 lbs., $98-$108.

Winnipeg will hold sales on Fridays only during the summer.

– Amanda Lefley writes for Resource News International

(RNI), a Winnipeg company specializing in grain and

commodity market reporting.

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