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Lack Of Pasture, Hay, Straw Don’t Bode Well

Fl o o d i n g and excess water have caused numerous problems

for producers across Manitoba, and according to one observer in the industry, there could be more problems still to come.

Ross Taylor of Taylor Auction Services at Melita said cattle producers in the southwest corner of the province have had a difficult time finding pasture land for their animals, given the wet conditions. Lots of pastures were still under water, he said.

Keith Cleaver, manager of Heartland Livestock at Brandon, said pasture conditions were much the same in that neck of the woods. “We need to dry out and get some heat,” he said.

Wet conditions have also been a factor in hay crops in the southern part of the province, with the challenge being getting onto the land.

“The hay crop will be tremendous, but how is it going to get cut? There’s too much water sitting in it,” Taylor said. “One producer out here had his entire alfalfa crop written off because it had been under water for too long.”

The hay crop needed some heat to help it progress, as well as to dry up any water sitting in the field, he said.

Not only could hay supplies be a problem come fall and into the winter, Taylor said straw supplies could also be tight, as it has been too wet for producers to plant crops, such as wheat and barley, which provide straw.

“There is way too much water. There is virtually no crop planted in this area,” Taylor said. “Officials have said 30 per cent got planted out here, but I would be surprised if even 10 per cent has gone in the ground. Straw in this area is going to be a real problem.”

Finding feed could also be a problem later this year, he said. Many producers are still feeding animals as their pastures are flooded.

“They are going to have troubles finding feed, there is no question about that,” he said. “They aren’t out of feed yet, but it is coming.”

As far as the market was concerned during the week ended June 20, Taylor said prices were steady to higher – which impressed him, given the time of year.

“There weren’t many cattle around, and there were a few guys trying to buy a few extra grass animals,” he said.

FROM THE AUCTION FLOORS

Note:AllpricesinCanadian dollarsperhundredweight (cwt).Thesepricesalsogenerally representthetopone-third ofsalesreportedbythe auctionyard.

Ashern Livestock Mart: Prices unavailable from June 15 sale.

Gladstone Auction Mart: Prices unavailable from June

14 sale.Summer schedule: Final sale in mid-July. Sales to resume in mid-August.

Grunthal Livestock Auction Mart:Summer schedule in place. No sales until August.

Heartland Livestock Services, Brandon:A total of 339 cattle were on offer in Brandon at the June 14 sale. In the slaughter market, D1-D2 cows went for $67-$73; D3 cows, $62-$66; feeder cows, $54-$61; and good bulls, $82- $88.

Feeder steers weighing 900- 1,000 lbs. ranged from $91 to $106.25; 800-900 lbs., $92- $105; 700-800 lbs., $112-$122; 600-700 lbs., $120-$130; 500- 600 lbs., $122-$132; and 400- 500 lbs., $125-$138.

Feeder heifers weighing 900-1,000 lbs. brought $83- $99; 800-900 lbs., $85-$105.50; 700-800 lbs., $100-$107.75; 600-700 lbs., $110-$118.50; 500-600 lbs., $112-$120; and 400-500 lbs., $112-$122.

Heartland Livestock Services, Virden:A total of 472 cattle were on offer in Virden at the June 15 sale. In the slaughter market, D1-D2 cows went for $65-$71; D3 cows, $60-$65; feeder cows, $67-$73; and good bulls, $83-$88.25.

Feeder steers weighing 800- 900 lbs. ranged from $98 to $111; 700-800 lbs., $110-$122; 600-700 lbs., $117-$136; and 500-600 lbs., $120-$140.

Feeder heifers weighing 800-900 lbs. brought $94-$105; 700-800 lbs., $100-$112; 600- 700 lbs., $108-$120; and 500- 600 lbs., $110-$122.

Killarney Auction Mart:No prices available from June 16 sale. Auctions to resume in August.

Ste. Rose Auction Mart: There were a total of 165 cattle for sale at the June 16 auction. In the slaughter market, D1 and D2 cows ranged from $62 to $72; D3 and D4 cows, $50-$65; canners, $35-$54; and bulls, $88-$98.Summer schedule:Final sale before summer break to take place June 23.

Taylor Auctions, Melita: The sale held June 16 resulted in 120 slaughter cattle and 80 feeders being sold. In the slaughter market, D1 and D2 cows sold from $65 to $72; D3 and D5 cows, $55-$65; and good bulls, $85-$90.

Feeder steers weighing 900- 1,000 lbs. brought $105-$110; 800-900 lbs., $110-$118; 700- 800 lbs., $115-$132; 600-700 lbs., $120-$135; 500-600 lbs., $125-$140; 400-500 lbs., $130- $145; and 300-400 lbs., $135- $150.

Feeder heifers weighing 800-900 lbs. traded from $100 to $110; 700-800 lbs., $105- $115; 600-700 lbs., $110-$120; 500-600 lbs., $115-$125; 400- 500 lbs., $120-$130; and 300- 400 lbs., $130-$140.Summer schedule:Final sale before summer break June 23, with auctions to resume Aug. 18.

Winnipeg Livestock Sales: There were about 290 cattle sold at the sale held June 17. In the slaughter market, age-verified/ young cows ranged from $58 to $75; D1 and D2 cows, $66-$69; D3 cows, $60- $66; shelly cows, $53-$60; and mature bulls, $78-$90.

Feeder steers weighing 700-800 lbs. brought $115- $122; 600-700 lbs., $125-$133; and 500-600 lbs., $125-$136. Feeder heifers weighing 700- 800 lbs. traded from $100 to $103, and 600-700 lbs., $108- $120.

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BRENT HARDERCNSC

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– Ross Taylor, Taylor Auction Services,Melita

Thehaycropwillbetremendous, buthowisitgoingtogetcut?”

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