GFM Network News


Letters: Manitoba ag minister is disingenuous

Minister Pedersen’s explanation for the “muddling” of the unit transfer issue in a recent letter published on the Manitoba Co-operator website is deceptive at best. Of course the transitional regulation was not operational. Leaseholders were waiting for it to become so… as was promised October 2019. We know that unit transfer was not enshrined in

Letters: Unit transfers on Crown Lands never policy

As Minister of Agriculture and Resource Development, I believe it is important and timely to clear up a few misconceptions concerning Agricultural Crown Land Leases and modernization of Crown land leases, legacy leases and unit transfers. Through 2018 and 2019, in consultation with stakeholders, the ACL Program undertook a comprehensive regulatory review to align future

It’s not true to say that AgriStability is fundamentally broken, says Keystone Agricultural Producers.

Letters: BRM not ‘fundamentally broken’

In a November 5 Manitoba Co-operator article on AgriStability reform, we read some frustration into Minister Pedersen’s comment, “And what we keep asking KAP to do is to look at the long term on this.” KAP is intently focused on the long term. That is why our vision statement is “A sustainable and profitable future

Letters: Crown land leaseholders betrayed

Our provincial minister of agriculture wants you to believe that he generously gave leaseholders what they wanted after there was a huge uproar over proposed Crown land modernization changes made by then minister Ralph Eichler. That is not the case. After huge leaseholder protests, Ralph Eichler conceded and agreed to bring back family transfers, ensuring

Letters: Time for new priorities

In response to the Aug. 31 story in the Manitoba Co-operator, “Municipal Board considering benchmark ruling.” Very often we hear the outcry for economic development and resurrection of employment with no concerns whatsoever for water sources, environment and a quality of living. Only a degree of risk is sometimes mentioned. Without water, there is no


Letters: Quarry fight reveals undermining of democracy

In response to letters by Jon Crowson and Ruth Pryzner in the Aug. 6 Manitoba Co-operator: Democracy — It was paid for by the blood and casualties of veterans and those who paid the supreme sacrifice, who now lie in graves in distant lands, far from their loved ones, family and homeland. I am a

Letters: Seed growers should be wary of merger

In response to Allan Dawson’s seed sector merger story: Seed growers should pay attention to the Aug. 27 vote to merge the Canadian Seed Growers’ Association (CSGA) with four other organizations, including the Canadian Seed Trade Association (CSTA). The vote on the most important potential change in 100 years is during farmers’ busy harvest season.

The proposed quarry site, currently a sunflower field and abandoned farm site. A barn and a house on the site were demolished this spring.

Letters: The ugly side of Bill 19

Geralyn Wichers needs to be commended for her in-depth reporting on the Lilyfield Quarry controversy. After all that has transpired in the RM of Rosser, one has to wonder what part of “no” the quarry developer has trouble understanding. Now, under Bill 19, we face the prospect of the ruling Conservatives’ proxy, in the form


Letters: Quarry fight reveals Bill 19 undermines representation

The people in the RM of Rosser are experiencing first hand what those who opposed Bill 19 understood was the real purpose of the bill. To reduce people’s ability to protect themselves from certain developments contrary to their interests and for municipal councils to properly represent them. The message is clear. People and their quality

Letters: Gene editing offers widespread benefits

Regarding the column “Gene editing a risk communication fiasco in the making,” Manitoba Co-operator, July 22, 2020. Sylvain Charlebois is right: our industry did a poor job of communicating to the public about GMOs. As a result, misinformation about the safety and benefits of the technology continue to persist almost 25 years later despite the