GFM Network News

Signs of blackleg in a canola seedling.

New tool on the way for canola growers safeguards against blackleg

Saltro is a new seed treatment to control blackleg at the seedling stage expected to be available for the 2021 growing season

A new fungicide to protect canola seedlings from blackleg, a major yield-robbing disease, could be available as a seed treatment for the 2021 growing season. It’s called Saltro and was developed by Syngenta. “Syngenta anticipates registration in time to make it available for use in the 2021 growing season,” Sarah Osborne, company marketing operations manager,

Canola production on the Prairies takes a weather hit

But that effect on production may have already been digested by the market

Poor harvest weather definitely cut into the size and quality of this year’s Canadian canola crop, with a large percentage still in the fields heading into the end of October. However, that supportive supply-side story may be factored into the futures for the time being, with the market now in need of some fresh demand

With the number of days in harvest 2019 diminishing, canola prices have had a recent lift.

As snow falls, canola market rises

Weather alone won’t sustain canola’s rally for long

An early winter storm on the western Prairies and persistent cool and wet conditions to the east put the brakes on harvest operations during the first few days of October, with canola futures finding some support on the back of adverse weather. After holding within a sideways trading range for the past three months, the

Clubroot spores infect canola roots and produce galls that prevent plants for taking up moisture and nutrients.

What does the new resistance-evading clubroot mean for Manitoba canola growers?

A new clubroot strain not controlled by canola varieties with traditional 
resistance genes has been found in Manitoba, but farmers can still keep this 
potentially devastating in check by being proactive

The discovery in south-central Manitoba of a new clubroot strain not controlled by traditional resistant canola varieties underscores the need to be proactive in keeping clubroot spore numbers low enough so they don’t damage canola crops. The 3A clubroot pathotype was found in a field in the RM of Pembina, Manitoba Agriculture posted on its

Canola growers might welcome tariffs on China, but in the end it will function more as a tax on Canadian consumers than a punishment for a rule breaking trade partner.

Canola win for Canada at WTO could be a ‘pyrrhic victory’

But that doesn’t mean Canada shouldn’t challenge China at the World Trade Organization, a move being welcomed by farmers and industry alike


It may be a case where winning feels more like losing. Canada is taking China to the WTO over the ongoing dispute over canola seed. But even if Canada prevails, there’s no guarantee China will resume shipments, and the victory could prove Pyhrric, as any tarrifs that Canada might then legally impose could end up


Two University of Manitoba agricultural economists say it’s wrong to assume all of the price drop in canola is due to losing the China market.

How much has losing China cost Canadian canola growers?

The canola council estimates $1 billion on annual basis, but a recent report says the price drop is within the recent trading range

Losing access to China’s canola seed market will cost Canadian farmers $1 billion annually, according to a Canola Council of Canada estimate. But University of Manitoba agricultural economists Derek Brewin and Ryan Cardwell aren’t so sure. The council’s estimate is based on canola futures prices having dropped 10 per cent from February, before China stopped

Since March Canadian canola exports have increased to some other countries, but not enough to offset what’s expected to be an extra million tonnes of potentially price-depressing canola carry-over at the end of the crop year July 31.

New Canadian canola seed sales made to China

Details are few but the canola council says normal canola trade with China has not been restored

Canada has made a “small amount” of new canola seed sales to China, but exports to Canada’s biggest canola customer aren’t back to normal. Not even close. “We are aware of a small amount of (canola seed) sales that have occurred (to China),” Brian Innes, the Canola Council of Canada’s vice-president of communications said in

Canada exported just 112,000 tonnes of canola to China in May based on sales made before the current dispute, down 79 per cent compared to May 2018.

Escalation of canola dispute with China won’t work

Market analyst Mike Jubinville doesn’t see a resolution any time soon

Retaliating against China over its import restrictions on Canadian canola will only make the dispute harder to resolve, according to MarketsFarm analyst Mike Jubinville. Some commentators and farmers are demanding Canada retaliate, for example, by subjecting Chinese imports to intense inspections. “Taking an aggressive position with China is absolutely pointless,” he said in an interview


Keep it Clean wants farmers to hear the message that glyphosate and other crop protection products need to be applied only according to the label.

If farmers keep misusing glyphosate, they may lose it

The warnings from the ‘Keep it Clean’ campaign are taking on a more urgent tone

If Canadian farmers want to keep using glyphosate they must stop misusing glyphosate. That blunt message was delivered earlier this summer during a ‘Keep it Clean’ webinar to agronomists and retailers, who were urged to pass it on to their farmer-clients. “We all know the value of glyphosate, but to be very blunt about it,

Plots at the GFM Discovery Farm compared planter versus airseeder performance on canola emergence.

Survival of the fittest

Can you get more bang for your buck by planting your canola?

The jury is still out on using row crop seeders to sow canola, despite a growing number of Manitoba producers who have the equipment in their sheds. The implements’ precision seed placement, and the associated promise of lower seeding rates without compromising on yield, has bolstered interest from growers who may have already invested in