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Boosting Legume Nitrogen Fix

McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, and Becker Underwood, Ames, Iowa, have signed a commercial licensing agreement granting Becker Underwood exclusive rights to patented nitrogen-fixing technology developed by a team of McGill researchers. Becker Underwood is a developer, marketer and producer of bioagronomic products for agriculture.

Legumes such as soybeans, peanuts, peas, lentils and alfalfa form symbiotic relationships with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia bacteria. The bacteria populate the nodule as it is forming.

Inside the nodule, the bacteria are protected from environmental threats and receive nutrients that they need for survival from the plant. In return, the rhizobia bacteria capture nitrogen from the atmosphere and convert it into a nitrogen form that the plant can use.

The technology licensed to Becker Underwood involves a fatty acid compound shown to be highly effective in stimulating rhizobia to produce the substances needed for increased nodule formation and greater nitrogen fixation. With this technology incorporated into the company’s high-performing rhizobial inoculant products, producers of soybean, peanut, pea, lentil and alfalfa crops are expected to realize improved crop yields.

Eliminate Seeding Overlaps

Raven Industries, Inc. and Seed Hawk, Inc. have combined their technology to help producers cut down on seed and fertilizer overlaps in the field.

Beginning this fall, a new set of Raven precision application and planter section controls will be offered on the Seed Hawk line of seeders to control multiple functions from a single field computer, the Raven Viper Pro.

The first of these solutions combines fertilizer and seed section control from Raven with patent-pending seeder technology from Seed Hawk. Known as Sectional Control Technology, this system will virtually eliminate costly seed and fertilizer overlaps automatically for the customer, the companies say in a release.

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