GFM Network News


Stored grain has to be both cool and dry to minimize the risk of spoilage.

Drying grain may become the norm as harvests trend later

Natural air drying with supplemental heat hasn’t caught on in Alberta yet, but it soon could, says expert


Prairie farmers may need to get used to leaving grain in the field at harvest. “Harvest might be starting earlier, but poor weather during the harvest season is slowing down that last little bit of harvest, and there’s more and more crop being left in the field in October,” said Joy Agnew, program manager at

Two new blackleg tools for the 2018 growing season

Tools to estimate yield loss and pinpoint the strain infesting your fields can help reduce the economic hit

Blackleg has become an expensive problem for canola producers, but growers will soon have two new tools to reduce the economic impact of the disease. “Blackleg wasn’t a real concern even a few years ago, but now it’s becoming increasingly important,” said Stephen Strelkov, a professor of plant pathology at the University of Alberta. “This


Crop rotation and disease-resistant varieties are the best ways to manage blackleg in canola, said canola council agronomist 
Clint Jurke.

New blackleg diagnostic test available this fall

A new diagnostic test will make it easier for producers to match the right kind 
of blackleg-resistant seed to the specific race in their fields

There are things you can do this fall to reduce your risk of blackleg next spring — and the first step is to scout for it. “The more you can identify it, the more you’re going to know whether you’re successful at controlling it,” said Clint Jurke, agronomy director for the Canola Council of Canada.

Ask the right questions of your management consultant

Farmers can go online and get 10 different quotes for the same model of tractor — but that’s not so with hiring a farm business management consultant. “Farmers get frustrated when they look on the soft side of business — the management or consulting side — because they don’t know if they’re getting fair value,”




Quarantined ranches don’t have the facilities to feed the hundreds of calves they expected to sell in the fall, so Alberta Beef Producers is trying to get permission to use — and then find — feedlots willing to take them.

Compensation promised for ranches under TB quarantine

Ottawa promises financial help while Alberta Beef Producers trying to arrange 
for feedlots to take in calves

Beleaguered Alberta ranchers with quarantined herds are getting some relief as the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has approved a beef industry plan to allow calves to be sent to feedlots. “We’re working with the CFIA on the conditions and requirements,” said Rich Smith, executive director of Alberta Beef Producers. “Obviously, it would be hard to

Six limiting factors in your soil that will make or break your operation

Without these six key ingredients, your soil — and your farm — could be in trouble

Farms and grazing operations — organic or otherwise — are only as good as their worst resource, according to Oregon-based grazier Abe Collins. “Soil is our primary infrastructure on the farm,” said Collins, who spoke at the recent Organic Alberta conference. “Biologically, chemically, and physically, you need to be looking at the limiting factors in


Young graziers need to do more with less, and cover crop cocktail mixes are a way they can do that, says grazier Graeme Finn.

This ain’t your grandad’s grazing system

Innovative producers, especially younger ones, are looking to cover crop cocktail mixes to get more production per acre

Nearly 150 people — some from as far away as Manitoba — converged on a farm near Hardisty recently to learn more about cover crop cocktail mixes. But tour organizer Graeme Finn noticed something a little different about the crowd at the event in late August — it was mainly young farmers. “Young people can’t

Five steps to market-ready canola

International buyers are testing like never before — but meeting their standards is easy

Growing a good canola crop isn’t just about high yield or quality — it’s also about getting that crop ready to market on a global scale. “We export about 90 per cent of what we produce in Canada, so being able to meet the requirements of our export customers is really important for having open