GFM Network News


Estimates show about 14 per cent of the 2019 U.S. corn and soybean crops will be unsold when the 2020 harvest begins.

Comment: What we know about corn and soy estimates

This year could shape up to be at least as challenging as 2019 was

The best way to begin a new year is to start with what we know. For example, we know the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) December World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimate shows that about 14 per cent of the 2019 U.S. corn and soybean crops will be unsold when the 2020 harvest begins next

As the White House openly panders to its rural voters, China, wall or no wall, continues to play the long game.

Comment: U.S. trade policy hits the Great Wall

China plays the long game; United States keeps getting played

Several years ago, when Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Tom Friedman was asked to choose which rising Asian nation, China or India, he’d bet the farm on, Friedman didn’t hesitate to pick India. The reason, he explained, was that while both nations were on an expressway to the future, India, the world’s largest democracy, had an open


Comment: Walking in the shadow of hope

The first obvious sign of the season-long flood is a perfectly level, three-foot-high ring of dried mud on the machine shed’s siding. Nature put it there and, in time, will likely wash it away. Across the road, 100 feet behind a noticeably tilting mailbox, stands the empty, sagging farmhouse of my youth. It sports no

One group predicts that 371 million acres of U.S. farm- and ranchland will change hands in the next 15 years, roughly translating to four out of every 10 acres.

Comment: Agriculture’s coming heart transplant

A lot of farmland is expected to change hands in the coming years

If government and private estimates are accurate, hundreds of millions of North American farm acres will have new owners in the next 15 years. For example, the National Agricultural Statistics Service, the Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) survey takers and record keepers, predicts that 100 million acres of today’s farmland will be sold by its current

Comment: A good tradesperson leaves a lasting legacy

In the early-morning fog the other day, I heard a claw hammer’s tap, tap, bam, bam, bam, boom drive a nail into its place for who knows how many years. A moment later, another six, clear, sharp notes cut through the fog and another nail was set for, maybe, a century or more. There were


Beyond Meat signage featured on a screen during the company's IPO at the Nasdaq Market site in New York, May 2, 2019.

Comment: Agriculture should welcome, not mock, fake meat

P.T. Barnum, the quintessential showman, might have found today’s food carnival more interesting and far more profitable than his namesake circus of yore. For example, slow food is taking note of the fast rise of meatless, or plant-based, burgers this year. Veggie burgers, their previous incarnation, are not new; the lovely Catherine, my significant other

U.S. President Donald Trump listens to a question as he speaks to reporters, March 29, 2019.

Opinion: The enemy of my enemy remains an enemy

Trade wars are proving more complex than the tweeter-in-chief expected

Most farmers are old enough to remember when the U.S. president noted that “trade wars are good, and easy to win.” That was, after all, several tariff hikes, dozens of trade meetings, and more than 15,000 presidential tweets ago. It may seem like a lifetime but it was just 19 months ago, on March 2,

The almost automatic, guaranteed political support farmers and ranchers once received from the public is quickly draining.

Opinion: Agriculture leaking support fast

When you’ve been in the ag journalism game for almost 40 years, few things surprise you. And, yet, on June 21, the Washington Post published a farm-based story that made even this greybeard marvel at how tone deaf and superior sounding rural politics has become. Even more startling was the reader reaction to that growing


Why is the White House linking your grain markets to its struggling immigration policy?

Comment: Welcome to paradise, er, paradox

There’s an interesting paradox occurring in today’s commodity and financial markets. Maybe you’ve noticed it; market watchers certainly have. Here’s what they’ve seen: Every time President Donald J. Trump takes to Twitter to threaten a nation with import tariffs — most recently, Mexico — the U.S. stock market shoots higher. Paradoxically, however, every time U.S.

Excessive rain in parts of the Midwestern U.S. has put the brakes on many farmers' planting plans.

Comment: ‘A lick and a promise’ aren’t enough

It’s one of the worst seeding seasons in memory for Midwestern U.S. farmers and their government isn’t helping

Most American farmers spent the last week of May and the first week of June either driving through mud or stuck in it. Their two farming partners, Mother Nature and Uncle Sam, were little help; one brought threats of more rain and mud, the other threats of more tariffs and bailouts. Farmers in my neighbourhood,