GFM Network News


Crops like soybeans, corn and oats are all showing good margins and will compete with canola for acres in Manitoba.

Canola looks pretty profitable, but so do a lot of other crops

Examining Manitoba's break-even yield risk ratio

Before you think we’ll see canola seeded from fence post to fence post this year, it’s good to look at some numbers. And while canola gets a lot of news coverage because of its futures market, the good news this year is that most other crops are showing high prices as well. However, while these

An aerial view of a bale-grazing pod on the Nerbas farm.

Many options, obstacles for value added

Many entrants are young, driven and with few other options to farm

Young farmers face “strict realities,” said speaker Phil Veldhuis, who teaches value-added agriculture at the University of Manitoba. They also have some opportunities in value-added production and direct marketing. Veldhuis heads Direct Farm Manitoba, which represents mainly small-scale farmers who sell direct to the public, grocery stores and restaurants. Many farmer members of the group



Cashing out: The history of the cash advance in Manitoba

Cashing out: The history of the cash advance in Manitoba

Manitoba’s corn cash advance started 40 years ago followed shortly by canola

Corn was the first non-wheat board crop in Manitoba to qualify for the federal government’s cash advance program starting in 1981. Jim Pedersen, who was president of the Manitoba Corn Growers’ Association at the time, helped get the association incorporated — a prerequisite to administering the program that offers low- and no-interest loans to farmers

Oats. (Doug Wilson photo courtesy ARS/USDA)

Oats riding high with other crops

MarketsFarm — Increased demand, both domestically and overseas, has caused the price of oats grown in Western Canada to rise compared to last year. And so far, seeding projections and rising prices for other crops suggest the market for oats won’t go down anytime soon. According to Prairie Ag Hotwire data from Wednesday, high-delivered bids


Take a systematic approach to improving the ecosystems beneath your feet.

There’s a teeming world of diversity and complexity in your field’s soil

This soil ecologist says six principles can be applied to improve soil health

Soil is more than just dirt, a place where plants put down roots to grow seeds. It’s a complex ecology, teeming with infinite varieties of flora, fauna, microbes and minerals that provide both the raw materials and machinery to build crops and livestock. It’s a factory floor with a lot of moving parts and we’re

WGEA executive director Wade Sobkowich. (Manitoba Co-operator photo by Allan Dawson)

Railways to blame for terminal shortages, WGEA says

Grain handlers take issue with MarketsFarm report

MarketsFarm — The association representing the Prairies’ main grain handling companies says recent delays in loading vessels have less to do with the availability of grain and more to do with the railways hauling it to port. The Western Grain Elevator Association (WGEA), which represents major handlers such as Viterra, Richardson, Cargill and others, raised

Manitoba’s newest grower group seeks the right blend of crop research and advocacy work.

MCA focused on research, but being pulled towards policy

While MCA doesn’t want to become an advocacy group, there are policy questions to address

Funding and directing research remains Manitoba Crop Alliance’s (MCA) focus — but there’s pressure for the fledgling commodity group to get more involved in farm policy. “Farmers have suggested that we need to be more involved in advocacy directly on their behalf,” MCA chair and Reston farmer Fred Greig told the MCA’s inaugural annual meeting


(WPohlDesign/iStock/Getty Images)

Klassen: Cold weather slows feeder cattle market activity

Compared to last week, western Canadian feeder cattle prices were relatively unchanged. Extreme temperatures blanketed Western Canada last week. Many auction barns cancelled sales or had limited numbers on offer. Buyers attended sales either in person or via the internet, which was supportive to the overall price structure. Many backgrounders and cow-calf producers delayed sales

(Dave Bedard photo)

StatsCan confirms canola stocks tightening

Wheat stocks also down from previous year-end

MarketsFarm — Solid demand from exporters and domestic crushers continues to eat rapidly through Canada’s canola stocks, which as of Dec. 31 were down nearly 24 per cent from the same date a year earlier, according to new data released Friday from Statistics Canada. The government agency pegged total canola stocks in the country as