GFM Network News


A field in the Interlake, May 23. Some fields in Manitoba are in need of rain while others have been so wet they've sunk equipment up to the axles in mud.

A tale of two springs

This spring has created a sharp divide with some producers wrapping up, while others have been stuck

Growers would greet a rainfall very differently right now, depending on where they are in the province. For producers in the southeast and the eastern stretches of central Manitoba, rain is probably a welcome sight with crops in the ground and little precipitation so far this spring. Others, who have watched equipment sink down to

Slow spring increases root rot risk

Early-seeded pulses may be setup for root rot concerns this year, given the cold spring and saturated soils

Mud may have kept you out of fields this spring, but pulse experts warn that root rots might be plenty active under the surface. Cool temperatures and soil moisture curbed producer efforts to access fields this year. The province estimated that only nine per cent of seeding was complete in Manitoba after the first week


Manitoba’s Agriculture Department reported seeding at about 42 per cent complete at the end of the second week of May, down from the three-year average of about 55 per cent.

Canola futures run up into resistance

Canola’s downturn likely followed declines in CBOT soybeans and soyoil

After grinding higher for most of the past month, the ICE Futures canola market ran into resistance and took back a large portion of those gains during the week ended May 22. The July contract traded just below resistance around the 100-day moving average, near $475 per tonne, for a number of days before finally

Fair weather sees seeded cereal, canola crops quickly emerge

Manitoba Crop Report and Crop Weather report for May 26

Southwest Region Most of the southwest region received rainfall during past week and on the weekend. Thundershowers in some areas brought a significant rainfall in short period of time. Amounts are varied and can be viewed here. Some areas close to Boissevain and southeast parts of the region toward Killarney, already dealing with surplus moisture,

Clubroot and other crop diseases have startlingly similar transmission pathways and preventive measures as public health challenges such as COVID.

How canola diseases act like COVID-19

There are startling similarities between public health and plant health as coronavirus precautions reveal

With the COVID-19 pandemic, society is gaining a whole new understanding of how diseases spread and how following proper precautions can make a huge impact on slowing the spread. While the human stakes are lower for crop diseases, the economic stakes can be high — and the similarities between COVID-19 and crop disease management is


Canola holds steady as seeding gets underway

Crude oil pressures and potential for major soy exports weigh in on trading

Canola prices held steady during the week ended May 15, despite turbulence from outside markets. Nearby canola contracts started the week at $471.30 per tonne and traded on either side of unchanged for consecutive trading sessions during the week. On May 14, the July contract closed at $470.70 per tonne. July soyoil dropped by about

For the past decade, North Dakota State University has conducted field research on bean yields versus plant population and row size.

Dry beans respond to row spacing and plant population

Trials on black and navy beans show a slight advantage to narrow spacing and higher plant population

Narrower row spacing and higher plant populations have some advantage in dry bean production, according to research by North Dakota State University. For the past decade, NDSU has been conducting field research examining the response of black, navy and pinto beans to different combinations of row spacings and plant populations to identify optimum seed yield. Research focused on black and navy beans grown

This field of soybeans near Altamont was snow covered Oct. 17, 2019, but was eventually harvested last fall. However, more than 400,000 acres of annual insured crops weren’t harvested as of Nov. 20, 2019.

What acres remain from harvest 2019 unclear

It’s believed a lot of corn and sunflowers were combined this winter, but it’s not clear how much of other crops remain to be harvested

Last fall thousands of acres went unharvested because of wet conditions. How much crop was taken off between then and now is unknown, as are the number of acres still worth harvesting. “From what we understand most producers really haven’t been able to address their unharvested acres in any fashion either to combine it, or destroy it, or whatever,” David Van Deynze, Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation’s


Coronavirus leaves grain markets uncertain

A lot remains to be worked out as spring marches ever nearer

COVID-19 remained the overarching feature of just about everything in early April — the grain and oilseed markets included. The virus has touched all aspects of society and the ongoing uncertainty of what it means for trade led to choppy activity in the agricultural commodities. Canola futures bounced around during the week ended April 9,